Confronting Climate Change

While there is much alignment on the issue of climate change, there are also points of differentiation, illustrating the complexity of the challenges facing the farmers and consumers of the future.

I Believe Climate Change Is Occurring

Overwhelmingly, next-gen farmers and consumers indicate they believe climate change is occurring, and the majority across markets believe that humans have contributed to it. The majority of those farmers and consumers who believe climate change is occurring also believe it will hurt the global food supply in the next 20 years.

Those who believe in climate change say that the most serious threats to food and farming from climate change will be food price increases, new diseases that destroy crops and livestock, disruptions to crop-growing cycles, food shortages and the destruction of crops.

The top contributors to climate change in the next 20 years — according to the majority of both farmers and consumers — will be the burning of fossil fuels by industry and deforestation.

When it comes to prioritising the challenges they would most like farmers and consumers to come together to solve, next-gen farmers and consumers across all countries put issues related to climate change at the top of their lists. They also do not see this as being only the responsibility of one group, with some indicating that they want to join forces to find ways in which both farming and consumption can change to have a lower impact on climate.

See also: Everyone Will Need to Compromise to Secure the Future of Food

In the end, they are aligned on the future they want, with over 90% of farmers and consumers agreeing that they want to live in a world where we don’t have to choose between the environment and having enough to eat.

“I think we need to focus on climate change — because that’s going to change the way things are produced — and the main thing we have to do is to sustain farms.”

Consumer, US

Findings

The top contributors to climate change — according to the majority of farmers and consumers — are the burning of fossil fuels by large industries and deforestation. Lower on the list are gases released by farming practices and through the raising of livestock and poultry.

This may explain why, when consumers and farmers are asked what they believe can be controlled to minimize the impact on climate change in the next 20 years, both groups prioritize the burning of fossil fuels by large industries and deforestation.

Most Serious Threats Climate Change Might
Pose to Farming in the Next 20 Years

Despite some misalignment when it comes to how they view the biggest contributors to climate change, next-gen farmers and consumers both put climate change towards the top of the list of issues they want to come together to address. Specifically, they say they want to find ways in which both farming and consumption can change to have a lower impact on climate.

They also aspire to a future that protects both farming and the environment — a difficult challenge — with over 90% agreeing that they want to live in a world where no one has to choose between the environment and having enough to eat.


Corteva Agriscience was launched in 2019 with the goal of enriching the lives of those who produce and those who consume — for generations to come. This commitment to the future has put Corteva at the forefront of shaping the next generation of agriculture. To better understand those who will be centrally responsible for the future of farms and food in the next 20 years, Corteva worked with independent research company Kantar to take the pulse of Gen Z and millennial (“nextgen”) farmers and consumers across five countries — Brazil, China, France, Russia and the US.

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